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30 revealing ideas from social psychology that can help us to appreciate people and our lives

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Below are interesting points (sometimes with some of personal thoughts & reflections) that I have learned from a course on social psychology taught by Professor Scott Plous of Wesleyan College.

@~@ Know yourself. Seach inside yourself.
LaoZi : "He who knows others is learned. He who knows himself is enlightened."
Benjamin Franklin : "There are three things extremely hard: steel, a diamond, and to know one’s self"
Daniel Gilbert : "We seem to know less about the worlds inside our heads that about the world our heads are inside."

@~@ People often MISWANT.
Blueroselady :
How to overcome the challenge that we are remarkably bad at predicting of what will make us happy?
This question is very important because many of life’s big decisions involve predicting our future feelings.
Examples of life’s big decisions : marriage, career / profession, migration, vacation.
Funny real-life example : a friend J told me that her husband fluctuates between praising-in-the-form of question and complaining:
(1) "why a such a smart woman like you wanted to marry a jerk and stayed on?"
(2) "It’s a nightmare to be with you for the rest of your life, I was enticed by your physical attractions"

@~@ Most people are too preoccupied with themselves to notice our shortcomings (e.g. your pimple, your spiky hair because of having no time to comb your hair because of waking up late).

@~@ "Research has found that audiences can’t pick up on your anxiety as well as you might expect …
Other people are noticing less than you might suppose."
Blueroselady: The next time you have to deliver a public talk / give a company presentation / make a sales pitch, do not worry. Just do it!

@~@ Susan Andersen & Serena Chen, 2002: In our varied relationships, we have varying selves.

@~@ Much of our behavior is not consciously controlled but automatic and unself-conscious.
Blueroselady: Be mindful. We can choose to practice mindfulness.
Mindful breathing… Mindful eating… Mindful doing…

@~@ self-schema vs possible selves
self-schema = beliefs about self that organize & guide the procession of self-relevant information.
possible selves = images of what we dream of or dread becoming in the future.
self-schema strongly affect how we see / perceive, remember, evaluate other people & ourselves.

@~@ major negative events vs minor irritations
major negative events activate our psychological defense.
minor irritations do not activate our psychological immunity.

@~@ Role playing becomes reality.
As we enact a new role, e.g. college student, parent. salesperson, we initially feel self-conscious.
Progressively, the role playing becomes reality.
This reminds me on the message that Amy Cuddy wants us to remember in her TED talk on body language.
Fake it till you make it.
Fake it till you become it.

@~@ How do we decide if we are rich, smart, or tall?
The answer is social comparison (Festinger, 1954) in affluence, status, achievement.
Blueroselady: Many things in life (that I know of) are relative, particularly those that are measurable.
A reader’s question: "I have made a living comparing data in my job / career. Comparing has become my second nature. How can I stop comparing in life?"
Blueroselady suggestions:
# Gratitude exercises.
# Detachment exercises : Detach your emotions from the outcome of your comparisons. I hear you, it is easy to say, but challenging to do, that is why detachment is an art; for the sake of our happiness, we must practice the art of detachment.
# Mindfulness exercises : Remember that (1) social comparisons can decrease our life satisfaction. (2) 人比人气死人 (3) "There is nothing noble in being superior to some other person. The true nobility is in being superior to your previous self."
# Kindness exercises : Be kind & compassionate to yourself, leave behind comparisons with others.
# Affirmations e.g. It is better to be a first rate version of yourself than a second rate version of someone else.

@~@ Children whom other people label as as gifted, hardworking or helpful tend to incorporate such ideas into their self-concepts & behavior.

@~@ Self-reliance
Self-reliant individual is celebrated in Western literature, e.g. The Iliad, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.

@~@ Classifying / pigeonholing / labeling cultures as solely individualist or collectivist oversimplifies.
The oversimplification is because within any culture, individualism varies from person to person (Oyserman et al, 2002).
Blueroselady: Remember not to do hasty generalization.

@~@ Interdependent self
# has a greater sense of belonging.
# is defined by social connections with family, colleagues, loyal friends.
# has many selves: self-with-parents, self-at-work, self-with-friends.
# disapproves egotism, whereas independent self disapproves conformity.
# e.g. collectivistic Asian & Third World cultures.
# persists more on tasks when they are failing because wants to meet others’ expectations (e.g Japanese)
# prioritizes WE over ME

@~@ "So far, most of psychology has been produced by psychologists in middle-class White American settings studying middle-class White American respondents."
However, there are ways of life beyond the one that each of us knows best.
Blueroselady: In other space & time context (e.g. sociocultural context), there can be different ideas & practices about how to live a meaningful life.

@~@ Tips: eat before shopping.
Gilbert & Wilson (2000) showed that hungry shoppers do more impulse buying

@~@ Why is your friend’s success can be more threatening that that of strangers?
According to Zuckerman & Jost (2001), you feel that your self-esteem is threatened.
How do people react to self-esteem threat?
High self-esteem people blame others or try harder next time.
Low self-esteem people blame themselves or give up.
According to Roy Baumeister, folks with high self-esteem are more likely to be obnoxious, to interrupt, & to talk at people rather than to talk with people.
Bonus: It is useful for parents to know that
# among sibling relationships, the threat to self-esteem is greates for an older chld with a highly capable younger brother / sister.
# many people could not escape their tough childhoods, which is a cause of low self-esteem.

@~@ Secure self-esteem
# is rooted more in feeling good about who one is than in grades, looks, affluence / money, others’ approval.
# is essential for long-term well-being.
# Blueroselady views secure self-esteem neither as high nor low self-esteem, but self-esteem in equilibrium / in balance.

@~@ self-esteem vs self-efficacy
self-esteem = if you like yourself overall
Self-efficacy = if you believe you can do something

@~@ How to be less intimated (by others) & less gullible?
# remember that personal testimonies are powerfully persuasive but they may also be wrong.

@~@ Self-serving bias?
# attribute positive outcomes to oneself (e.g. own managerial skill)
# attribute negative outcomes to other factors (e.g. a down economy)

@~@ Examples of self-serving bias
# Group members’ estimates of how much they contribute to a join task typically sum to more than 100%. For instance, husband & wife are members of a group.
# most business people see themselves as more ethical than the average business people.
# Pronin & Ross (2006) reported that we see ourselves as objective & everyone else as biased. No wonder we fight!

@~@ Feedback is best when it is TRUE & SPECIFIC.
Specific feedback e.g. You are good at maths.
General feedback e.g. You are great.
To encourage someone (e.g. children, mentees, students, subordinates), remember that specific feedback is more effective than general feedback.

@~@ To improve performance, give self-efficacy feedback instead of self-esteem feedback.
e.g. of self-efficacy feedback : You tried really hard.
e.g. of self-esteem feedback : You are really smart.

@~@ When to listen to criticism & not to listen?
David Dunning’s gentle rule: "if two people independently give you the same piece of negative feedback, you should at least consider the possibility that it might be true"

@~@ Terror management theory by Jeff Greenberg: the reality of our own death motivates us to gain recognition from our work & values, but not everyone can achieve such recognition.

@~@ Competence + perseverance = success

@~@ Success requires enough optimism to sustain hope and enough pessimism to motivate concern.

@~@ According to Jule Norem (2000), defensive pessimism can sometimes save us from the perils of unrealistic optimism.
Blueroselady: Negative emotions such as anger and pessimism are not entirely bad, we just need healthy ways to deal with them.
Tips: Whenever you feel angry, remember that the person you are hurting is yourself.

@~@ Tyranny of freedom? too many choices can lead to paralysis.
According to Barry Schwartz, individualistic modern cultures have an excess of freedom which leads to the tyranny of freedom.
# Choice may enhance regret.
# People have expressed greater satisfaction with irrevocable choices than with reversible choices. This is because when people can undo their decisions they tend to consider both the positive & negative features of the decisions they had made. When they could not undo their decisions, people tend to concentrate on the positive features & ignore the negative features. For example, people expressed more satisfaction with their marriages several decades ago when marriage was more irrevocable.

@~@ Love causes marriage, but marriage would also causes love.
Blueroselady: This hypothesis may explain why arranged marriages (in some cultures) have successfully worked and survived.

@~@ The 5:1 ratio of positive:negative activities
To sustain important relationships such as marriage and parental relationships, ensure that you strive to increase the ratio of positive to negative activities by at least 5 fold.
e.g. of positive activities : holding hands, giving a hug, lending a listening ear.
e.g. of negative activities : arguing, complaining.

More
# Book: Social Psychology. Chapter 2. DG Myers. 2012.
# Notes at the end of email

Written by blueroselady

December 26, 2013 at 3:55 am

How to deal with rude people? 20 diplomatic survival tips

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I was visiting a friend of mine R and witnessed how rude her dishonest employee talked to her.
The employee often gave R condescending look, used swearing words while talking to R, never said sorry after spoiling things.
R is kind, gentle and soft-spoken.
That’s possibly why she has been taken advantage of.
Fortunately, based on my observations, most people whom R encounters in life are kind & respectful to her.

I could understand R’s feeling, she has to spend her hard-earned $ to hire the employee and yet receive such kind of treatment.

R is a positive woman, she confessed to me that her encounter with the rude has made her appreciate her kind, polite, understanding friends (including me!) and family even much more.

However, once in a while, we may encounter rude people.

Rude person abuses others verbally and emotionally.
So, how to deal with rude people (applicable to rude co-workers, associates, customers, employees, managers, bosses)?

1. Do not expect everyone to be nice and friendly;

do not expect rude people to change,
yet we do our best to be nice / polite / kind to everyone. This is the same principle as the gratitude law / principle: we are to express our gratitude in life yet do not expect gratitude from others. Ingratitude is common and when someone expresses gratitude to us, the person really adds rainbow to our life.

2. Do not ask "Why do bad things happen to good people?", instead ask more empowering / better questions, e.g. "How to deal with adversities / overcome challenges (e.g. rude people)?"

3. Reframe our perspectives / perceptions / beliefs.
Do not feel / declare yourself as a victim because you do not want to worsen your pain.

4. Give the rude person kindness, sympathy, empathy.
Note:
Being kind does not mean that you tolerate one abuse after another.
Being kind simply means that you respond to the other person politely.
Being empathic is nice, but being over-empathic is not. Everything in excess disturbs harmony / equilibrium.

5. Understand that irrationality is a human quality.
A person can be rude and channel their frustrations to you for no rational reason.
R’s employee was rude to R probably due to R being too kind, gentle, much younger, more talented, more loved & likable.

6. Understand that prejudice / bias is also sadly a human quality. The rude person may have some prejudice about our age, gender, race, occupation and so on; especially if the rude person behaves differently to others.

The rude person may also judge you for something else that you’ve done.
It is not easy to shift / change other people & their judgment.
Release our need to change the rude person / to improve them.
Practice the art of detachment.
It is better to leap / focus yourself for GREATER PURPOSEs in life.

7. Seek POSITIVE MEANINGs from the unhappy encounter like what my friend R did, she realizes how wonderful her friends and family are.

Many things in life are relative,
if we have never experience bad things in life,
we may take our blessings for granted.

8. Focus on your GREATER PURPOSEs / things in which we can contribute more values to our lives, our loved ones and others.

9. Align / seek help from the more powerful / wise people who can help us. If necessary (e.g. in the case that you cannot immediately employ any exit strategy), humbly request the more powerful / wise to be a mediator.
Observe how others (especially the more powerful / wise) handle the rude person.

10. The art of endurance enables you to endure injustice / insult / pain / stress.
Be resilient.
吃得苦中苦方为人上人
Use thick face & Love yourself.
Never let the words of others hurt you.
Do not take it personally / seriously.
Don’t Take Anything Personally: Nothing others do is because of you. What others say and do is a projection of their own reality, their own dream. … the opinions and actions of others, you won’t be the victim of needless suffering. ~Don Miguel Ruiz

11. Raise your consciousness.
Decide that you are not going to get dragged down into the rude person’s drama; be above the fray.
To quote Rene Descartes, "Whenever anyone has offended me, I try to raise my soul so high that the offense cannot reach it."
Imagine yourself as any of these:
deeply grounded oak tree that no storm can shake my inmost calm.
bamboo that bend but do not break upon encountering rude treatment.
super filter that listen to only kind words and quick to filter out rude words by others.
shielding bubble that protects you from the rude people, the harmful effects will never hurt you.

12. See the encounter as a learning opportunity.
My friend R told me that she has learned things that she will not do (especially subconsciously) to other people from her rude employee (based on what the employee did to her and the hurtful effects on R).

13. Silent treatment. The saying goes that silence is golden.
A study showed that people who completely ignore those deemed rude and offensive were more mentally healthy than those who engage with the rude.
However, this tips works for the rude person we encounter once in a while, but not the persistently rude (e.g. direct bosses / employees / regular customers).
For the rude person that we may have to deal more often at particular time and location in our lives:
Consider looking at the rude person directly in the eye and don’t say a thing (neither disagree nor agree with them).

14. Master our emotion. Do not express fear, anger, pride, to prevent uttering wrong words that can exacerbate the situation.

15. Understand the sources of our negative emotions (e.g. fear, anger) caused by the rude person, then practice the art of detachment.

16. Do not react immediately. Practice Siberian North Rail Road technique (Stop Breath Notice Reflect Respond).
Then you will have more time to choose your response.
Dearest reader, I know that this can be difficult to do, because you might want to fight back in the heat of the moment,
but with practice, like everything else, you will get better.
You can also consult / reflect on what your mentors / guru / jedi will do if they encounter similar situations,
and then make a firm decision on how to respond.

17. Do not confront / burn the bridge if you have little / no bargaining power, e.g. rude bosses, unless you have nothing to lose, e.g. you have secured a better job.
Know when to stand up for yourself. Choose your battle carefully, if the battle does not worth the fight, just use the exit strategies.
How to stand up for ourselves?
Draw our boundaries. Be clear on what we will tolerate and what we will not tolerate.

18. Do not retaliate using threats to prevent agitating the rude person.
Let the universe judge injustice.

19. Beware of analysis paralysis. Do not over think / over-analyze your behavior or the rude person, your history of interactions.

"Someone who is so hurtful towards you does not deserve any more of your energy."

20. EXIT strategies.
For example, my friend can choose not to continue hiring the rude employee.
Minimize contacts / ignore the rude person.
Stay away from any rude stranger.
Keep the rude person out of sight, out of mind.
Leave / avoid the rude person when there is no reason to stay, e.g. just leave / avoid obnoxious drivers. There is no use to talk to them.

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Written by blueroselady

April 17, 2013 at 6:05 am

Posted in psychology

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"Sorry" : how different people perceive it differently

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Story 1:
Having lived in England, I am somehow influenced by their highly polite nature.
For a small mistake / unintentional little offense, the English will say "I am very sorry".
Note the use of "very".
I was impressed by their high level of politeness.
The English (the people in my workplace, my school, my church) appears to be highly civilized,
of course there are also 小混混,
on the street,
I encountered once, the 小混混 who spit on me.
The encounter made me extra careful,
to avoid some area.
Eventually, I enjoyed happy life,
and collected one of the most beautiful memories of my life,
while I was in England.

After I left England, I realize that some of the English who said "I am very sorry", might not mean it so much, it has been their habit to say such a too 客气话. But, I really appreciate their kindness (see, this is an example that I have been influenced by the English).

Story 2:
SM does not like to hear anyone says sorry for a simple mistake / error.
She feels that the word sorry is reserved for a big mistake.
She also thinks that people who say the word sorry too easily, when they say sorry, they do not sincerely mean that they regret what they did.

Messages of the stories:
1. Awareness of different meaning of words to different people, is important.
2. Use words wisely (adapt our choice of words for different people).

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Written by blueroselady

March 11, 2013 at 3:06 pm

Posted in pyschology

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What are people emotionally hungry for?

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According to Les Giblin, the author of Confidence and Power in Dealing with People, people are hungry for:
Admiration
Affirmation
Approval
Appreciation
Acceptance

When Blueroselady loves herself, she will be able to love others.
When Blueroselady likes herself, she will be able to like others.
Thus, Blueroselady is constantly improving herself.
Self-help
Instead of seeking admiration, affirmation, approval, appreciation and acceptance from other people, Blueroselady constantly provides them to herself.

People are more pleased at a compliment if we praise them for something that is not glaringly obvious.
Praise the ACTIVITY / action / performance / job, not the person. This way of praising is more specific and sincere.
Similarly, if we must give constructive criticism,
criticize the ACTIVITY / action / performance / job, not the person. This way of criticizing is impersonal.

Do not compete with other people to make ourselves seem better / more important at their expense.
Never criticize someone in front of someone else.
Do not speak negatively about ANYTHING (including our competitors). People do not like negative people.

Related:
How not to listen to non-constructive criticism?
How to play the game of life?
The 10 most important things
Leadership

Written by blueroselady

October 16, 2012 at 3:52 pm

How to deal with difficult people

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Think of the followings:
surly colleagues who miss promotions
lazy subordinates
stubborn bosses

No matter where we go, we will encounter difficult people, but we can make our life easy using some learned strategies.

TIPS:
1. I am FLEXIBLE in my approach: to adapt to my colleagues’ temperaments.
2. VERBAL skills. Keep my remarks unemotional (e.g. when I try to diffuse a tough situation).

Approach any conflict with 2 viewpoints / perspectives / interpretations in mind: mine and theirs.
Then, I construct my arguments in a way that encourages my colleagues to respond positively.

3. NEGOTIATION
No point in winning small battles if I lose the war.
Focus on areas of common ground.

4. HUMOR
People cannot laugh and be angry at the same time.
Just recall an amusing incident can lower tension.

Thank you:
Frances Kay, author of "Dealing with difficult people for rookies"

Written by blueroselady

May 30, 2012 at 2:52 pm

Entrepreneur: Ruben Gnanalingam of Westports on people

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Ruben Gnanalingam is the CEO of Westports in Port Kluang, Malaysia.

His father won the bid in 1994 to operate Westports.

I found it hard to relate to Ruben in the context of his privilege to attend Eton, which opens the path to LSE.

In 2012, the school fee of Eton is more than GBP 30,000 per annum.

With my current economic situation, I will not be able to send any boy to Eton.

However, I like Ruben’s attitude to credit his people.

Westports hire 4000 employees.

I saw my boss, his boss and the boss of his boss, do struggle with people, with some success and some failure.

Dealing with people is one of the most important things to master for an entpreneuer.

In Ruben’s words:

“Anyone with the finances can buy equipment and build the wharf,

but it is not easy to buy people and culture.

We MOTIVATE people, PLAN well and AUTOMATE processes to make it easier for our people to work.

We try to KEEP our WORD and create a FRIENDLY and FLEXIBLE culture.”

Taj Mahal was not built by Shah Jahan,

Taj Mahal was built by the workers.

Source: Forbes Asia March 2012

Written by blueroselady

April 11, 2012 at 3:58 pm

Book: The Seven habits of Highly Effective People

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Author: Stephen Covey

PARADIGMS & PRINCIPLES

Pygmalion effect = self-fulfilling prophecies.
Whether you think you can or whether you think you can’t, you’re right – Henry Ford. p7.

Blueroselady 7Hs:
Healthy
Hopeful
Happy
Harmonious
Humble
Hardworking
Helpful

Your attitude determines your altitude.
Smiling wins more friends than frowning.
Whatever the mind of man can conceive and believe it can achieve.

cultivated internal sources of security so that our own feelings of worth were not dependent on our children’s “acceptable” behavior. p8.

The term Paradigm Shift was introduced by Thomas Kuhn in his highly influential landmark book, The Structure of Scientific Revolutions.
Newtonian model was partial, incomplete!

Many people experience a similar fundamental shift in thinking when they face a life-threatening crisis and suddenly see their priorities in a different light, or when they suddenly step into a new role, such as that of husband or wife, parent or grandparent, manager or leader. p14.

once children gain a sense of real possession, they share very naturally, freely, and spontaneously. p19.

there are times to teach and times not to teach.

If you want to have a more pleasant, cooperative teenager, be a more understanding, empathic, CONSISTENT, loving parent.

We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act, but a habit. — Aristotl. p22.

a habit = the intersection of knowledge, skill, and desire.

INTERDEPENDENCE: we — we can do it: we can cooperate; we can combine our talents and abilities and create something greater together. p23.

If I were emotionally dependent, my sense of worth and security would come from your opinion of me.

My sense of worth would not be a function of being liked or treated well. p24.

If I am emotionally interdependent, I derive a great sense of worth within myself, but I also recognize the need for love, for giving, and for receiving love from others.

If I am intellectually interdependent, I realize that I need the best thinking of other people to join with my own.

In our quest for short-term returns, or results, we often ruin a prized physical asset — a car, a computer, a washer or dryer, even our body or our environment.

Our most important financial asset is our own capacity to earn.

Blueroselady: LITTLE KINDNESS and COURTESIES are so important to a deep relationship. p26.

You can go for the golden egg of popularity, of pleasing your children, giving them their way all the time. Then they grow up without a personal commitment to being disciplined or responsible.

There are organizations that talk a lot about the customer and then completely neglect the people that deal with the customer — the employees. p28.
Blueroselady: When I set up my enterprise, I will treat my employees like my customers.

Blueroselady: In order to be a good learner, one has to be a good teacher. Share or discuss what you learn with someone else within 2 days after you learn it.

Define yourself from within, rather than by people’s opinions or by comparisons to others.

In the words of Thomas Paine, “That which we obtain too easily, we esteem too lightly. It is dearness only which gives everything its value. Heaven knows how to put a proper price on its goods.”

Written by blueroselady

May 29, 2011 at 3:30 pm

Posted in book, pyschology

Tagged with , , ,

How to understand people?

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Hypothesis: People do not care about us.
This is not because people are mean or hurtful, but simply because PEOPLE are mostly FOCUSED ON THEMSELVES.

In the pie chart, 60% of thoughts are self-directed. My goals. My problems. My feelings. Another 30% are directed towards relationships, but how they affect me. What does Julie think of me? How will boss evaluate my performance in the next review? Do my friends like me or see me as irritating?

Only 10% in this model is time spent in empathy. Empathy is the rare event where one person actually feels the emotions, problems and perspective of another person. Instead of asking what Julie thinks of me, I ask what is Julie thinking.
Blueroselady aspires to have MORE EMPATHY.

Within that 10%, most people then divide attention between hundreds of other people they know. As a result, you would occupy a fraction of a percentage in most peoples minds, and only a couple percentage points in a deeply bonded relationship. Even if you are in another persons thoughts, it is how your relationship affects them, not you.

What does this mean?
Blueroselady said no more reason to feel embarrassed or ashamed! Embarrassment does not make a lot of sense. Since others are only focusing a small portion of there thoughts onto judging you, your self-judgement is overwhelmingly larger.
People who appear to be mean or hurtful do not usually do it intentionally. There are exceptions to this, but generally the hurt you feel is a side-effect, not the principle cause.
Relationships are your job to maintain. Do not wait to be invited to parties or for people to approach you.

Hypothesis: People are self-absorbed
Take an OPTIMISTIC, but realistic view of people.
Do not place your individual happiness in the hands of another person (or people).

Hypothesis: Behavior is Largely Dictated by Selfish Altruism

Selfish altruism is basically win/win. It is where helping you directly or indirectly helps me. There are a couple main categories where this applies:
1. Transactions – If I purchase a car, both myself and the dealer benefit. I get a vehicle, which I want. The dealer gets money to improve his lifestyle. This is the predominant form of selfish altruism between people who don’t have emotional bonds.
2. Familial – Blood is thicker than water. We are designed to protect people who share our genes. This can sometimes shift towards extremely close friends and loved ones.
3. Status – Helping someone is a sign of power. Many species of primates will offer assistance as a sign of dominance. People act similarly, offering aid to boost their self-esteem and reputation.
4. IMPLIED RECIPROCITY – Many relationships are based on the idea that if I help you, one day you will help me as well.
Occasionally behavior falls outside this group. Nameless heroes dying for causes that don’t help their bloodline. Volunteers devoting their time towards humanitarian missions. But these are the minority, whereas most actions can be explained by some form of selfish altruism.

Hypothesis: People Have Poor Memories

People are more likely to remember your similarities than your differences (unless they were emotionally incensed by them).

People are forgetful by nature, so once again, don’t assume malice or disinterest if something is forgotten. The other side of this rule is that you can demonstrate reliability by having a good memory or system (if it doesn’t fail you).

Hypothesis: Everyone is emotional

We all have our individual problems, angst and upsets that are normally contained. You don’t need to call people out on their private deception, but being sensitive to those underlying currents gives you an advantage in trying to help.

Hypothesis: People are lonely
People are especially sensitive to any threats to becoming ostracized.
Recognizing this feeling of LONELINESS as COMMON, will help us to minimize it.

References:
1. http://www.scotthyoung.com/blog/2007/08/28/the-critical-7-rules-to-understand-people/

Written by blueroselady

August 1, 2010 at 5:44 am

What would be your advice for people who would like to take up leadership positions?

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In 2004, my answer is “Enthusiasm, dedication, self-sacrifice and continuous self corroboration are important. Leaders should have specific and realistic visions and convey them their people so that they can be achieved. Leaders also have to be honestly concerned for people and their needs.

In 2010, leadership is serving. When others are better than us, we must be willing to be led and assist our leaders. When we are the most suitable to lead, we have prepared along the way to be leaders and will give our best.

Written by blueroselady

July 17, 2010 at 12:46 am

2010 International Essay Contest for Young People

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I have written for this competition before and strongly encouraged you, my brothers and sisters, who are students and between 15-25 years to participate and share your ideas.

Organized by The Goi Peace Foundation and UNESCO
Endorsed by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan
Japanese National Commission for UNESCO, Japan Broadcasting Corporation,
Nikkei Inc., Tokyo Metropolitan Board of Education

The United Nations has designated 2001-2010 as the “International Decade for a Culture of Peace and Non-Violence for the Children of the World” and 2005-2014 as the “United Nations Decade of Education for Sustainable Development.” Additionally, 2010 celebrates the International Year of Youth as well as the International Year for the Rapprochement of Cultures. Young people are encouraged to participate in these global initiatives and play a leading role in promoting peace and understanding among all cultures.

Theme:

“MY ROLE IN CREATING A PEACEFUL WORLD”
What is your vision of a peaceful and harmonious world? What can you and the young people of the world do to realize that vision?

Guidelines:
1. Essays may be submitted by anyone up to 25 years old (as of June 30, 2010) in one of the following age categories:
a) Children (ages up to 14) b) Youth (ages 15 – 25)
2. Essays must be 800 words or less in English, French, Spanish or German; or 1600 characters or less in Japanese, typed or printed.
3. Essays must have a cover page indicating (1) category (Children or Youth) (2) essay title(3) your name (4) mailing address (5) phone number (6) e-mail address (7) nationality (8) age as of June 30, 2010 (9) sex (10) school name (if applicable) (11) word count.
Teachers and youth directors may submit a collection of essays from their class or group. Please enclose a list of participants’ names and the name and contact information of the submitting teacher or director.
(Entries missing any of the above information will not be considered.)
4. Entries may be submitted by postal mail or e-mail.
(Email entries must be in text or MS Word format, with the cover page and essay sent together as one document.)
5. Essays must be original and unpublished.
6. Essays must be written by one person. Co-authored essays are not accepted.
7. Copyright of the essays entered will be assigned to the organizers.

Deadline: Entries must be received by June 30, 2010.

Awards: The following awards will be given in the Children’s category and Youth category respectively:
1st Prize: Certificate and prize of 100,000 Yen (approx. US$1,000) … 1 entrant
2nd Prize: Certificate and prize of 50,000 Yen (approx. US$500) … 2 entrants
3rd Prize: Certificate and gift … 5 entrants
Honorable Mention: Certificate and gift … 25 entrants

* 1st prize winners will be invited to the award ceremony in Tokyo, Japan scheduled for November 2010. (Travel expenses will be covered by the organizers.)

** All prize winners will be announced in November 2010 on the Goi Peace Foundation web site (www.goipeace.or.jp) and UNESCO web site (www.unesco.org/youth).

Please send your entries to: International Essay Contest c/o The Goi Peace Foundation
1-4-5 Hirakawacho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-0093 Japan
E-mail: essay@goipeace.or.jp

Written by blueroselady

February 12, 2010 at 5:16 am

Posted in study, travel

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